Bush survival could be difficult for BC homicide suspects say Tataskweyak residents

first_imgBrittany HobsonAPTN NewsAs the search continues for two men accused of killing three people in British Columbia, many are left wondering how the two are surviving the rough terrain of northern Manitoba.Kilometres of water and forest surround many of the communities, including Tataskweyak Cree Nation.The landscape offers a scenic view, but it also poses many risks for people who aren’t from the north.“As far as surviving out in the bush, I think that’s really dangerous if you’re not a northerner and you don’t know the area,” Tataskweyak resident Eunice Beardy told APTN News.Beardy grew up in the bush, as it is affectionately known as to locals.Much of northern Manitoba is made up of forested areas.It’s where an extensive search for Kam McLeod and Bryer Schmegelsky has been taking place since last Wednesday.The two are charged with second-degree murder in the death of Leonard Dyck, and are considered suspects in the deaths of American Chynna Deese and Lucas Fowler, who is from Australia.RCMP had focused their search on Gillam and Fox Lake Cree Nation, but the vast area has proven difficult.Eunice Beardy grew up in the bush and says outsiders might not know how to survive. Photo: APTN.Beardy said there are a number of places the two could hide and survive.“There’s a lot of cabins out there and we leave stuff in the cabins. There’s food…[and] in some places they have their four wheelers outside the cabins,” she said.Without shelter the two are exposed to various elements such as bugs, animals and muskeg, a swampy-like marsh area.Ernest Bittern is a fisherman and trapper in Tataskweyak.He said the bush is no place for the inexperienced.“You got to know how to survive. Even when a person gets lost they start panicking,” he said.Ernest Bittern says fishing or hunting is a necessity for survival in the bush. Photo: APTN.Bittern said despite the rough terrain the two can survive if they find a reliable food source.“If they know how to catch fish there’s usually creeks where you can go down and grab a fish…or if they have some kind of weapon they could probably shoot an animal,” he said.Leadership in Tataskweyak told APTN the two fugitives came through the community last Monday before police announced they were suspects in the deaths.Robert Spence, a councillor, said they stopped to get gas before heading to Gillam, approximately 175 kilometres north of Tataskweyak.Their vehicle was found later that day burned out.When asked by reporters if the McLeod and Schmegelsky could be dead, RCMP said Wednesday it’s a possibility.“The north part of the province is a very unforgiving place…very challenging terrain. We’re keeping all possibilities in mind as we go forward,” said Assistant Commissioner Jane MacLatchy.She also announced police would be scaling back their search efforts over the next [email protected]@bhobs22last_img

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