DR Congo – UN has launches its first surveillance drone

first_imgAdvertisement GOMA, DR Congo – The UN peacekeeping mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo on Tuesday officially launched a surveillance drone in the strife-torn northeast in the first such move by the United Nations.The Italian-made pilotless aircraft was launched at 12:01 pm (1001 GMT) from the airport in Goma, capital of North Kivu province, at a media event attended by the chief of UN peacekeeping operations, Herve Ladsous and several diplomats.The UN mission in the DR Congo, MONUSCO, currently has two such drones. According to a military expert in the capital Kinshasa, both aircraft began trial flights on Sunday. – Advertisement – The drones, which are unarmed and exclusively equipped for reconnaissance flights, are intended to help the United Nations to watch over North Kivu, a mineral-rich province prey to dozens of armed movements, which MONUSCO troops have been ordered to neutralise, including by force.The aircraft will also be used to survey the porous borders between North Kivu and Rwanda and Uganda, in a bid to prevent these countries from providing support to groups inside DR Congo.The United Nations accused both neighbouring countries of backing a powerful rebel group, the Movement of March 23 (M23), which surrendered on November 5 after a joint assault by the Congolese army and a new UN special intervention brigade with an unprecedented offensive mandate.The governments in Kigali and Kampala denied the charges of backing the M23.In the longer term, MONUSCO is due to be equipped with five drones built by Selex ES, a subsidiary of the Italian aeronautical and defence firm Finmeccanica. The UN mission counts on round-the-clock aerial surveillance by March next year.Source: New Visionlast_img read more

New iPhone to Have DualCamera but No Headphone Jack

first_imgImage Credit: petapixel Advertisement The new iPhone set for release in September will have a dual-camera system, pressure sensitive home button, and will remove the headphone jack seen on previous models, according to Mark Gurman of Bloomberg.The well-connected journalist says Apple will unveil the iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus successors in September, ahead of a big iPhone overhaul in 2017.As rumored, the larger 2016 iPhone Plus will have a dual-camera system capable of taking better photos and brighter photos with more detail.Both sensors, which each capture color differently, simultaneously take a picture, and the device produces a single, merged photograph.The dual system sharpens photos taken in low-light environments. The combination of the merged photos from the two camera sensors also allows users to zoom while retaining more clarity – Advertisement – Both versions of the 2016 iPhone will retain the 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch form factor as seen on current models — keeping a similar look. However, Apple will remove the handset’s antenna lines for a cleaner look, the report says.Further, both models will have a home button that responds to pressure with a vibrating sensation on the finger, rather than a physical home button like on current models. Apple will likely include gestures to get users back to the home screen.The new models will run iOS 10, the new version of Apple’s mobile operating system coming this fall. The updated software offers interactive widgets to quickly glance at calendar appointments and favorite contacts, new messaging features, a new application for controlling smart home appliances, and a redesigned Apple Music. The new software will also run on current and some past iPhone models.Apple is keeping quiet on its next iPhone and hasn’t confirmed a launch event for Septemberlast_img read more

Visa helps merchants easily adopt new global specifications for QR Code payments

first_imgAdvertisement Visa announced its support of the new global QR Code Payment Specifications from EMVCo, the global technical body that manages the EMV Specifications. The specifications cover consumer-presented and merchant-presented QR code use cases for digital payment acceptance. QR Codes are two-dimensional machine-readable barcodes, used to facilitate mobile payments at the point-of-sale.Visa and the other EMVCo Members worked to develop these new globally interoperable EMV specifications. Visa has already successfully enabled the merchant-presented QR technology in 15 countries around the world, with India, Kenya and Nigeria currently live in market with both bank and merchant partners.“We’ve already seen tremendous progress towards adoption of standardized, interoperable QR code payment systems in the developing world,” said Sam Shrauger, SVP, Digital Products, Visa. “We are working with governments and central banks in countries like India to develop and implement QR code payment solutions that provide the convenience and security that are synonymous with Visa and help the journey toward a cashless future.” – Advertisement – Easy Implementation for MerchantsVisa has enabled the growth of merchant-presented QR code payments around the world with its innovative mobile payments solution, mVisa. mVisa allows consumers to pay for goods and services by scanning a QR code on a smart phone or entering a merchant number into their feature phones. Payment goes straight from the consumer’s Visa account into the merchant’s account and provides real-time notification to both parties. mVisa is completely interoperable, meaning that the consumer and the merchant do not need to be customers of the same bank. This brings the same convenience, security and reliability provided by the trusted Visa brand.For merchants eager to harness of the power of QR code payments, the Visa Ready Program has adopted the interoperable QR standards to develop tools and capabilities which help easy generation and deployment of QR code merchants by banks, processors and merchant aggregators. Once enrolled, merchants can freely accept payments from any country or bank given mVisa’s interoperability while trusting Visa will securely and efficiently process each transaction.[related-posts]QR Code Payments Driving a Cashless FutureAs digital payments help continue a shift toward a cashless future, this new global specification is an important step that promotes interoperability and standardizes the fast growing ecosystem of QR code payments across the world. Already, 33 banks and more than 328,000 merchants across India, Kenya and Nigeria have adopted the interoperable standards as they accelerate their QR code digital payment programs.“mVisa enables successful completion of the transaction independent of the mobile operator service on both the consumer and the merchants phone, and the consumers and merchant’s banks” said Shrauger. “This addresses a major challenge with mobile money programs, and lets consumers and merchants choose their own bank or mobile operator.”Reserve Bank of India has encouraged the adoption of standardized QR code payments to provide access to low-cost, secure digital payments to millions of consumers and merchants.  Working with our partners, Visa is converting both every day and recurring cash purchases to digital payments through direct integrations with supermarket chains and large utility billers. By presenting dynamic QR codes to consumers that provide a seamless payment experience, billers such Tata Sky, Idea Cellular, Reliance Energy, Mahanagar Gas, as well as Pizza Hut and supermarket chains Nakumatt, Spar, Zucchini are bringing benefits of digital payments to millions of potential customers.Visa intends to replicate this success in 12 other countries where mVisa has been enabled: Cambodia, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Pakistan, Rwanda, Tanzania, Thailand, Uganda and Vietnam.last_img read more

NEWS Asian Handicap Betting

first_imgASIAN HANDICAP BETTINGAs you may have read, or are about to find out – many overseas bookmakers are withdrawing from the UK market with immediate effect due to a change in UK gambling legislation.Several operators have already ceased trading with British residents, notably some prominent Asian Handicap specialists.At Star Sports we’re British based and proud of it too. So, it’s very much business as normal for us, including our popular Asian Handicap football markets.At Star Sports we are renowned for looking after the big-staking punters but here’s a secret, you get the same service whether you stake £5 or £100,0000. And just like you we are sports betting fanatics ourselves.To open an account, to place a bet or just to check our latest Asian Handicap price simply call us now on 08000 521 321.last_img read more

SIMON NOTT Chester Day Two betting report

first_img[dropcap]D[/dropcap]ay two of the Chester Boodles May Festival started in the garden of our digs. A couple of ladies wandered up the path as I was trying to get a phone signal.It transpired that they were Jehovah’s Witnesses. They very politely asked if I’d like a Watchtower. They showed me the cover, emblazoned ‘The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse’ was it an omen?After the opening Gateley PLC Changing The Legal Landscape Handicap it looked like it could be, a bad one. First horseman of the Apocalypse, Jim Crowley on winning 10/11 favourite Khairaat which knocked the ring badly. To make things worse the layers never had a chance as it won so nicely.The second apocalyptic horseman rode in on 6/4 favourite Deauville in the Sportingbet.com Huxley Stakes. This time it was Ryan Moore belying his angelic appearance serving it to the bookies. Baz the Tash bemoaned the results then reported that business was useless, adding ‘there’s more life in that cemetery over the road’. On the plus side and this blog likes that side best, if they can’t take it they can’t lose it.Baz may have been deadpan in his light-hearted delivery but there was little jollity in the ring after Mutawatheb won the Boodles Diamond Handicap. The well-backed 7/2 joint-jolly under the first apocalyptic horseman Jim Crowley who came back to sock it to the ring for a second time.I didn’t dare ask anyone how their day was going after Ryan Moore led home an Aidan O’Brien 1,2,3 on 5/2 favourite Venice Beach in the MBNA Chester Vase Stakes. Who needs four Horsemen when two demons get doubles? After four races the ring was being ravaged and badly needed a result.There was hope in the ring prior to the English Fine Cotton EBF Maiden Stakes. Course bookie Colin Wadey gave odds-on jolly Dahik as his lay of the day on Twitter. The infamous Racing Blogger expressed an interest and was quoted 4/5 by the broad-shouldered layer. Sadly ‘Bloggsie’ was in London so couldn’t avail himself, come racing for value. The rest is history Richard Kingscote rode a cracking race to win on 3/1 Dragon’s Tail with the jolly unplaced. Any in the ring that followed Colin’s advice got the money. The Blogger’s? Well that is probably in a London betting shop somewhere. To open an account 08000 521 321 Bloggsie! Hardly a proper result for the books in general but had the fight back started?The answer is no. Andrea Atzeni broke the hearts of the layers coming with a late swoop on 11/4 favourite Zamjar to win the T&L Leasing Handicap Stakes. Atenzi became the third Horseman of the Apocalypse. There was was still time for the fourth to show up but in reality it didn’t matter, the ring had already slithered down the financial abyss with very little chance of clambering out on the day.Praise be, the Gambling Gods finally relented and finally gave the bookmakers a break. 8/1 shot Storm King flew home in the concluding Virgin Atlantic Handicap Stakes. David Allen’s mount would have been a winner in most books and at very least stopped the rot. The books will be coming out for the big day tomorrow on the front foot. Where was the fourth horseman?’ Nobody knows but the ring was happy he went AWOL. Proper job.last_img read more

STARTERS ORDERS Sunday

first_img[dropcap]W[/dropcap]elcome to Starters Orders. Our daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Sunday 10 September HORSE RACING2.50 FontwellKereman 10/1 > 5/13.25 FontwellCode Of Law 2/1 > 5/44.35 FontwellLegal OK 10/1 > 5/1PREMIER LEAGUEPremier League16:00 Sky Sports Premier League / Sky Sports Main Event / Sky Sports Ultra HD7/5 Swansea City 21/10 Newcastle United 11/5 DRAWBET WITH STAR SPORTS 08000 521 321last_img

VitaLink monitors infants from afar

first_imgShareJeff Falk713-348-6775jfalk@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduVitaLink monitors infants from afarRice University students join forces on baby-saving device for developing nations HOUSTON – (April 30, 2013) – The ideal system for monitoring a baby’s health would be as simple as one, two, three. Three teams of senior engineering students at Rice University are working to do so wirelessly in neonatal wards in the developing world.The design teams have built a modular system to monitor an infant’s vital signs with a tablet that can track the progress – or warn of problems – for many babies at once.The VitaLink system keeps tabs on infants’ breathing, heart rate and body temperature. The system is designed to match the capabilities of nurseries in the developed world but at a cost more realistic to clinics in developing countries where the need is greatest.Gary Woods, a professor in the practice of computer technology in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and one of the team’s advisers, went to Africa last summer to see how his students could contribute to infant care at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi. The hospital has partnered with the Rice 360˚: Institute for Global Health Technologies to develop cost-effective systems. At Queen Elizabeth’s neonatal nursery, a very small staff must care for dozens of babies with no way to monitor a crowded ward all at once.“I came away with a pretty good idea of what it would take to make this project,” Woods said. He pitched the idea to his senior students last fall. “There were so many interested that we formed three teams,” he said. “Their goal has been to build a system that has a little battery-powered dongle that can record the vital signs of a baby and wirelessly transmit them to a central tablet,” he said.The three projects and their team members are the iNurse (the BioLink team of Nathan Lo, Abhijit Navlekar, Rahul Rekhi, Fabio Ussher and Eric Palmgren), VitaSign (Gbenga Badipe, Adrian Galindo, Alison Hightman, James Kerwin and John Slack) and the Scalable Wireless Alert Generator, aka SWAG (Yuqiang Mu, Chris Metzler, Kiran Pathakota and Matt Johnson). Each team built a component that contains the necessary electronics and can be linked together at the side of the crib to gather and deliver information.The iNurse monitors temperature and respiration. The VitaSign adds a low-cost, low-power heart-rate sensor. Both alert caregivers if they sense trouble.SWAG is where the information comes together. The iNurse and VitaSign are hooked to the SWAG “brick,” which sends data over the air to an Android tablet. The students designed a custom app to give caregivers an up-to-the-minute picture of multiple infants’ health. With its current Bluetooth implementation, the system can monitor several babies, but an upcoming revision to Bluetooth 4 would allow for many more.Putting 14 students on a project is highly unusual at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen (OEDK), which typically sees teams of three, four or five toiling away on a given task.“It was like a startup environment where you have different sub-teams working on one larger project,” Rekhi said. “It put more on us to be able to coordinate and ensure that our individual devices and departments could communicate. But it did feel like an entrepreneurial endeavor.”One member of the SWAG team, Johnson, will demonstrate the system in Ethiopia on behalf of Beyond Traditional Borders (BTB) this summer. “Another team will go to Malawi, so our project will potentially be going to both places,” he said. Johnson said he hopes to come back at the end of the summer “with a lot of good data, and next year we’ll have something really awesome.”Before it goes to Africa (and before they graduate next month), the students want to make the system robust enough to handle inconsistent power feeds. “Power is constantly in flux at Queen Elizabeth,” said Rekhi, a bioengineering major who worked there as a BTB intern last summer. “We want the battery backup to be able to handle the system in case of a power outage.” The team’s goal is to run the system for months on end on double-A batteries.They expect future design teams to enhance VitaLink. “By the end of our design cycle, I think we’ve actually done enough hardware implementation that we can hand it off and tell the next team they don’t have to worry about hardware any more,” said Pathakota, an electrical engineering student. “All they need to do is write really good software for it.”“It needs to be really simple and understand the entire ward,” added Metzler, who also studies electrical engineering. “It needs to be clear to the nurse how each baby is doing.”Maria Oden, director of the OEDK and a professor in the practice of engineering, and Ashu Sabharwal, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, also advised the teams. -30- http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/04/0505_VITALINK-1-web.jpgThree teams of Rice University senior engineering students participated in the creation of VitaLink, a wireless system to monitor the health of infants in developing countries. From left: (top) Adrian Galindo, Yuqiang Mu, Rahul Rekhi, Alison Hightman, Abhijit Navlekar, Fabio Ussher and Kiran Pathakota; (bottom) Eric Palmgren, Nathan Lo, Gbenga Badipe, Chris Metzler and James Kerwin. Team members Matt Johnson and John Slack are absent from the photo. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Watch a video about the VitaLink here: http://youtu.be/VceZhI5ZzQQ.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related Materials:Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen: http://oedk.rice.eduGeorge R. Brown School of Engineering: http://engr.rice.eduImages for download: http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/04/0505_VITALINK-3-web.jpgCaregivers in low-resource settings will be able to monitor the vital signs of infants through a tablet connected wirelessly to sensors that feed information to modular “bricks.”  (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)center_img http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/04/0505_VITALINK-2-web.jpgThe modular VitaLink system created by seniors at Rice University will monitor multiple infants through a wireless system that keeps tabs on their breathing, temperature and heart rates. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2013/04/0505_VITALINK-4-web.jpgRice University senior Alison Hightman places VitaLink sensors on a doll to test the system at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThislast_img read more

Nanomaterial safety on a nano budget

first_imgShareNEWS RELEASEEditor’s note: Links to high-resolution images for download appear at the end of this release.David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduNanomaterial safety on a nano budgetRice University researchers share their protocol for handling carbon nanotubes Rice University research scientist Varun Shenoy Gangoli puts gloved hands and a container into holes in a bag set up to contain nanomaterials while transferring them from bulk containers into smaller ones for lab use. The technique helps the lab keep nanomaterials from escaping into the environment. (Credit: Barron Research Group/Rice University) Varun Shenoy Gangoli, a research scientist at Rice University, models the proper attire for handling bulk nanomaterials for laboratory use. Gangoli and his colleagues developed a quick, clean and inexpensive method for transferring carbon nanotubes and offered it to other labs through a journal article. (Credit: Barron Research Group/Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionA plastic bucket and a plastic bag contain a 5-gallon supply of carbon nanotubes in a lab at Rice University, the beginning of the process to safely transfer the nanotubes for experimental use. Courtesy of the Barron Research GroupVarun Shenoy Gangoli, a research scientist in Barron’s lab, and Pavan Raja, a scientist with Rice’s Nanotechnology-Enabled Water Treatment center, developed for their own use a method that involves protecting the worker and sequestering loose tubes when removing smaller amounts of the material for use in experiments.Full details are available in the paper, but the precautions include making sure workers are properly attired with long pants, long sleeves, lab coats, full goggles and face masks, along with two pairs of gloves duct-taped to the lab coat sleeves. The improvised glove bag involves a 25-gallon trash bin with a plastic bag taped to the rim. The unopened storage container is placed inside, and then the bin is covered with another transparent trash bag, with small holes cut in the top for access.After transferring the nanotubes, acetone wipes are used to clean the gloves and more acetone is sprayed inside the barrel so settling nanotubes would stick to the surfaces. These can be recovered and returned to the storage container.Barron said it took lab members time to learn to use the protocol efficiently, “but now they can get their samples in 5 to 10 minutes.” He’s sure other labs can and will enhance the technique for their own circumstances. He noted a poster presented at the Ninth Guadalupe Workshop on the proper handling of carbon nanotubes earned recognition and discussion among the world’s premier researchers in the field, noting the importance of the work for agencies in general. A plastic bucket and a plastic bag contain a 5-gallon supply of carbon nanotubes in a lab at Rice University, representing the beginning of the process to safely transfer the nanotubes for experimental use. The Rice lab published its technique in SN Applied Sciences. (Credit: Barron Research Group/Rice University) Varun Shenoy Gangoli, a research scientist at Rice University, models the proper attire for handling bulk nanomaterials for laboratory use. Gangoli and his colleagues developed a quick, clean and inexpensive method for transferring carbon nanotubes and offered it to other labs through a journal article. (Credit: Barron Research Group/Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionGangoli puts gloved hands and a container into holes in a bag set up to contain nanomaterials while transferring them from bulk containers into smaller ones for lab use. Courtesy of the Barron Research Group“When we decided to write about this, we were originally just going to put it on the web and hope somebody would read it occasionally,” Barron said. “We couldn’t imagine who would publish it, but we heard that an editor at Springer Nature was really keen to have published articles like this.“I think this is something people will use,” he said. “There’s nothing outrageous but it helps everybody, from high schools and colleges that are starting to use nanoparticles for experiments to small companies. That was the goal: Let’s provide a process that doesn’t cost thousands of dollars to install and allows you to transfer nanomaterials safely and on a large scale. Finally, publish said work in an open-access journal to maximize the reach across the globe.”Gibran Liezer Esquenazi, an alumnus of the Barron group at Rice, is a co-author on the paper. Barron is a professor emeritus of chemistry at Rice and the Sêr Cymru Chair of Low Carbon Energy and Environment at Swansea University, Wales.Funding for the work was made available via the Robert A. Welch Foundation, the Office of Naval Research and the Welsh government through the Sêr Cymru Chair Program.-30-Read the paper at https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s42452-019-0647-5.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:Barron Research Group: http://barron.rice.edu/Barron.htmlRice Department of Chemistry: https://chemistry.rice.eduWiess School of Natural Sciences: https://naturalsciences.rice.eduImages for download: https://news-network.rice.edu/news/files/2019/06/0603_HANDLE-4-WEB.jpgA clean container of carbon nanotubes, ready for experiments, is the product of a quick, inexpensive method used in a Rice University lab to transfer nanomaterials. The method is the subject of a paper in SN Applied Sciences. (Credit: Barron Research Group/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,962 undergraduates and 3,027 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for quality of life by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. Return to article. Long Descriptioncenter_img https://news-network.rice.edu/news/files/2019/06/0603_HANDLE-1-WEB.jpgVarun Shenoy Gangoli, a research scientist at Rice University, models the proper attire for handling bulk nanomaterials for laboratory use. Gangoli and his colleagues developed a quick, clean and inexpensive method for transferring carbon nanotubes and offered it to other labs through a journal article. (Credit: Barron Research Group/Rice University)Long Description https://news-network.rice.edu/news/files/2019/06/0603_HANDLE-2-WEB.jpgA plastic bucket and a plastic bag contain a 5-gallon supply of carbon nanotubes in a lab at Rice University, the beginning of the process to safely transfer the nanotubes for experimental use. The Rice lab published its technique in SN Applied Sciences. (Credit: Barron Research Group/Rice University)Long Description Return to article. Long DescriptionVarun Shenoy Gangoli, a research scientist at Rice University, models the proper attire for handling bulk nanomaterials for laboratory use. Courtesy of the Barron Research GroupHOUSTON – (June 3, 2019) – With a little practice, it doesn’t take much more than 10 minutes, a couple of bags and a big bucket to keep nanomaterials in their place.The Rice University lab of chemist Andrew Barron works with bulk carbon nanotubes on a variety of projects. Years ago, members of the lab became concerned that nanotubes could escape into the air, and developed a cheap and clean method to keep them contained as they were transferred from large containers into jars for experimental use.More recently Barron himself became concerned that too few labs around the world were employing best practices to handle nanomaterials. He decided to share what his Rice team had learned.“There was a series of studies that said if you’re going to handle nanotubes, you really need to use safety protocols,” Barron said. “Then I saw a study that said many labs didn’t use any form of hood or containment system. In the U.S., it was really bad, and in Asia it was even worse. But there are a significant number of labs scaling up to use these materials at the kilogram scale without taking the proper precautions.”The lab’s inexpensive method is detailed in an open-access paper in the Springer Nature journal SN Applied Sciences.In bulk form, carbon nanotubes are fluffy and disperse easily if disturbed. The Rice lab typically stores the tubes in 5-gallon plastic buckets, and simply opening the lid is enough to send them flying because of their low density. FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis https://news-network.rice.edu/news/files/2019/06/0603_HANDLE-3a-WEB.jpgRice University research scientist Varun Shenoy Gangoli puts gloved hands and a container into holes in a bag set up to contain nanomaterials while transferring them from bulk containers into smaller ones for lab use. The technique helps the lab keep nanomaterials from escaping into the environment. (Credit: Barron Research Group/Rice University) A clean container of carbon nanotubes, ready for experiments, is the product of a quick, inexpensive method used in a Rice University lab to transfer nanomaterials. The method is the subject of a paper in SN Applied Sciences. (Credit: Barron Research Group/Rice University) Return to article. Long Descriptionlast_img read more

Osteen Explains Churchs Hurricane Harvey Response Again

first_img Share US Share this article  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Joel Osteen, the head of the sprawling Lakewood Church in Houston, is denying claims that his church turned away Hurricane Harvey victims, saying that keeping its doors closed for several days was the “safe thing” to do.“There [were] safety issues that people didn’t see. They see this building sitting up on a high hill, looks like a high hill, but behind the building is where the water comes in,” Osteen told Fox News in an interview on Sept. 3.“And so our flood gates were keeping the water out until, I’m told, Sunday night or maybe even early Monday.”He and a spokesperson for the church reiterated that the church isn’t a safe place to serve as a shelter because the first floor is underground and was flooded until last Monday. “We opened the building on Tuesday. I think that was the safe time to open it. I feel at peace about it,” Osteen told Fox.“We asked our security staff, we asked everyone… we have not turned away anybody. So anybody was welcome and we did take people in,” Osteen was quoted as saying. TMZ posted a video of a man showing that Osteen’s church’s doors were locked. Osteen’s spokesman, Donald Iloff Jr., told Fox News that he thinks the video is a “hit piece” as the video only shows one set of doors—out of 250 doors at the church.“It could be somebody wanting to discredit us,” Osteen also said.Osteen devoted a Sunday sermon to Harvey.A bicyclist stops to look at a truck flipped into floodwater in Port Arthur in Houston on on Sept. 1. Houston was limping back to life on Friday one week after Hurricane Harvey slammed into America's fourth-largest city and left a trail of devastation across other parts of southeast Texas. (Emily Kask /AFP/Getty Images) A bicyclist stops to look at a truck flipped into floodwater in Port Arthur in Houston on on Sept. 1.Houston was limping back to life on Friday one week after Hurricane Harvey slammed into America’s fourth-largest city and left a trail of devastation across other parts of southeast Texas. (Emily Kask /AFP/Getty Images)Residents wade with their belongings through flood waters brought by Tropical Storm Harvey in Northwest Houston, Texas, U.S. August 30, 2017. (REUTERS/Adrees Latif) Residents wade with their belongings through flood waters brought by Tropical Storm Harvey in Northwest Houston on August 30, 2017. (REUTERS/Adrees Latif)“Harvey came, but it didn’t take us out,” Osteen said, per the New York Daily News. “We are going to come out of this stronger than before.”Osteen and his church received criticism on social media, which he also addressed. “There’s been so much misinformation about the church last week, I wanted to clarify a few things,” Osteen said as the crowd clapped.“If we had opened the building earlier and someone was injured, or perhaps it flooded and people lost their lives, that would be a whole different story,” Osteen added. “I’m at peace with taking the heat for being precautious, but I don’t wanna take the heat for being foolish.”Sunday’s services drew about 1,200 people, which is down significantly from the usual turnout of around 16,000, according to the Houston Chronicle. center_img Osteen Explains Church’s Hurricane Harvey Response Again By Jack Phillips September 4, 2017 Updated: September 4, 2017 Show Discussion Joel Osteen, the pastor of Lakewood Church, stands with his wife, Victoria Osteen, as he conducts a service at his church as the city starts the process of rebuilding after severe flooding during Hurricane and Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston, Texas on Sept. 3, 2017. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) last_img read more